Category Archives: organic farming

The World Must Detoxify Its Toxic Farmlands: Devinder Sharma

Plenary address at the 19th Organic World Congress, New Delhi, Nov 19-11, 2017

“Any harm we inflict on nature will eventually return to haunt us… this is a reality we have to face.”  Xi Jinping, President of China

The evidence is all there. With soil fertility declining to almost zero in intensively farmed regions; excessive mining of groundwater sucking aquifers dry; and chemical inputs, including pesticides, becoming extremely pervasive in environment, the entire food chain has been contaminated. Further, as soils become sick, forests are logged for expanding industrial farming, erosion takes a heavy toll[1] leading to more desertification. With crop productivity stagnating thereby resulting in more chemicals being pumped to produce the same harvest, the farmlands have turned toxic. Modern agriculture has become a major contributor to Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHGs) leading to climate aberrations.

Read on here: https://foodvitalpublicservice.wordpress.com/world-must-detoxify-its-toxic-farmlands-devinder-sharma/

 

 

 

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More land is growing crops free from genetic modification and synthetic pesticides

Lancashire organic farmer, Tom Rigby (right) draws attention to news that In England, DEFRA data shows a 47.2% increase in land in organic conversion.

Latest government figures on UK organic food production show the sector is continuing to thrive on the back of strong organic food sales, says organic licensing body OF&G.

DEFRA’s organic farming statistics show that while the amount of organic land fell by 3.6% in 2016, the amount of UK farmland in organic conversion rose by more than 22% – rising to 47.2% in England. Their organic farming figures are available here.

Permanent pasture continues to account for the biggest share of the country’s organic area. The number of organic cattle increased on the previous year, while organic pig numbers rose by 5% and organic poultry numbers have shown the largest increase, rising by 10% to just over 2.8m birds

Roger Kerr, chief executive of the largest organic farming certifier OF&G (below right), said:

“The amount of land in organic conversion shows that farmers are recognising the huge potential from the sector to make a profit from farming organically.

“Industry figures show that the UK’s organic food sector is the only food sector showing consistent growth, with increases of between 7 and 10% reported this year. And with demand for organic products in the UK and globally predicted to grow again this year, we know UK farmers, growers and processors are attracted to organic production”.

Mr Kerr ends: “As demand increases for quality food, more support is needed to ensure UK production increases, and organic is pointing the way forward. We need more domestic production to feed the growing demand for quality food and organic has a critical part to play in that.”

 

 

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MEP Molly Scott Cato urges the Co-operative Group to source locally

Could co-operative retailers sell good quality food produced on their former farms (now owned by the Wellcome Trust) as MEP Molly Scott Cato advocated two years before the sale?

With foreboding in 2012, she saw the depressing comments from the Co-operative Group that the Co-operative Farms are a ‘non-core’ part of the business, and that attachment to them is sentimental, as indicating that the current generation of co-operative managers shared a short-sightedness about their role in providing customers with access to a reliable source of ‘good food’.

In 2010, Molly co-wrote a paper called ‘The co-operative path to food security‘. In it, she pointed to the increasing volatility of global food prices as speculators moved their gambling activities from financial products to commodities markets, saying, “It never was enough for me that the food I bought in my local Co-op was ethical and fairly-traded; as a green economist I also wanted it to be as local as possible”.  She continued: 

Supermarkets that sell the same corporate products as the rest have lost all but the merest token of a co-operative identity

“The Co-operative shops have not been as successful in this regard as I would like because of their centralised distribution system, but my own Midcounties Co-op has been building up its Local Harvest offer in recent years and I’m surely not the only customer who looks to see whether the vegetables on the shelves have been grown on the Co-operative Farms”.

Now that is no longer an option, the writer wonders if an agreement could be made with local Wellcome (former Co-op) farms to provide local food in Co-op stores – and offer some organic options for those who want to avoid food with pesticide residues?

 

 

 

 

Paul Sousek: farming sustainably

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A York reader writes, “I thought you might like this video from ‘The Future of Farming: Exploring Climate Smart Agriculture ‘ by University of Reading on FutureLearn – one of the more positive parts of my course i thought you would enjoy.”

In this video Paul Sousek, owner of Cottage Farm, speaks about farming sustainably.

The course is calledChallenges of sustainable farming: Discover Climate Smart Agriculture and how it could be applied to farming’.

The first video gives an overview of the course https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/climate-smart-agriculture 

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The editor values the memories of help given by Librarian John Creasey and Sadie Ward (Institute of Agricultural History, University of Reading) when preparing AN OVERVIEW OF INFORMATION ABOUT ALTERNATIVE PRACTICE IN BRITAIN, COLLECTED FROM APRILTO OCTOBER 1996, commissioned by the Centre for Holistic Studies, Mumbai